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-:  Past Lab Members  :-

 

 

Dr. Puthalakath V Hamsa

 

Puthalakath Laboratory

Principal Research Fellow

Department of Biochemistry

La Trobe University

Victoria 3086
AUSTRALIA

 

Phone: +61 3 9479 5226

Fax: +613 9479 2467

Email: h.puthalakath@latrobe.edu.au

 

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/biochemistry/lab/puthalakath/index.htm

 

 

Ph.D in 1995

Dr. Hamsa's Present work :

 

Dr. Pradeep Kachroo

 

Kachroo Laboratory

Associate Professor

Department of Plant Pathology

201F Plant Science Building
1405 Veterans Drive
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40546-0312, USA


Phone: 859.257.7445 Ext. 80729, Ext 80782 (Lab)
FAX: 859.323.1961

 

Email : pk62@uky.edu.

http://www.ca.uky.edu/agcollege/plantpathology/kachroo/

 

Ph.D in 1995

Dr. Kachroo's Present work :

Plants are challenged by a diverse range of microbial pathogens and insect pests and have evolved countermeasures to resist most potential  invaders. The outcome of the interaction of plants with a given pathogen is governed by several factors, including the genotype, the physiological state of the plant, environmental signals and, any specific interactions that might occur between the activated signaling pathways. Plants resist pathogen infection by inducing a defense response that is targeted specifically to combat invasion by the pathogen. In many cases, the induction of these responses is accompanied by localized cell death at the site of pathogen entry, which often is able to restrict the spread of pathogen to cell within and immediately surrounding the lesions. This phenomenon, known as the hypersensitive response, is one of the earliest visible manifestation of induced defense response and resembles programmed cell death in animals. Concurrent with hypersensitive response development, defense reactions are triggered locally and in parts distant from the site of primary infection. This phenomenon, known as systemic acquired resistance, is one of the most studied induced defense responses and is accompanied by a local and systemic increase in endogenous salicylic acid (SA) and a concomitant upregulation of a large set of defense genes.

Among various signaling molecules proposed to modulate defense responses, SA and jasmonic acid (JA) are widely believed to be the global regulators of plant defense signaling. These phytohormones elicit distinct responses and undergo extensive cross talk, which is likely to influence the amplitude and magnitude of various signals leading to a resistance response. JA and Methyl JA, collectively termed jasmonates, are potent biological regulators in plants that are formed in a multi step process initiated by oxygenation of the fatty acid (FA)-linolenic acid. Upon pathogen attack, FAs are liberated from their esterified forms and converted into oxylipins, a group of oxygenated FA derivatives. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxygenation of FAs results in the generation of a wide variety of compounds, many of which are found in plants and animals. In addition to their role as precursors of oxylipins, free FAs can also act as signaling messengers, regulate membrane fluidity and serve as an energy reserve.

The overall goal of our research is to help understand how specific signaling pathways are induced during host-pathogen interaction, how these pathways communicate with each other and the molecular mechanisms underlying such regulations. We are using Arabidopsis (www.arabidosis.org) as a model plant system and are studying its interaction with a viral pathogen turnip crinkle virus (TCV) and an oomycete pathogen Peronospora parasitica. With regards to signaling mechanisms our main interest is to decipher the role of fatty acid signaling pathways in plant defense.

 

 

Dr. Naweed I Naqvi

 

Senior Principal Investigator

Temasek Life Science Laboratory

1 Research Link, National University of Singapore

Singapore 117604

 

Phone : (65)-68727493 (O); (65)-67730683(R)

Mob : (65)-98297657

 

Email : naweed@tll.org.sg

 

http://www.tll.org.sg/naweed.asp

Ph.D in 1995

Dr. Naqvi's Present work :

My research group explores the basic molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying fungal pathogenesis. The long-term goal being the elucidation of specific developmental and physiological programs evolved by fungal pathogens to infect and colonize host plants. Presently, we utilize the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and its host Rice, as a model pathosystem for understanding fungal virulence and host specificity. We rely on molecular genetics, cell biology, biochemistry and functional genomics as tools to understand the molecular and regulatory basis of the infection-related development in fungal pathogens and to elucidate the underlying basis of the fungus-host interactions.

We initially established and utilized a novel forward-genetics approach to identify mutant derivatives of the blast fungus. We focus on the functional characterization of non-pathogenic mutants identified in the primary screening process. We are particularly interested in mutants that represent non-allelic lesions in pathways controlling host surface sensing, metabolism, signal transduction, osmoregulation, organellar and membrane biogenesis, ion homeostasis, targeted secretion etc. We also study the secondary metabolism associated with fungal virulence, and the host-specific regulation of these metabolic events during plant disease.

 

Dr. Mihali Raval - Pandya

Ph.D in 1996

 
Dr. Mandar N Dave

Ph.D in 1998

 

Dr. Aardra Potnis - Kachroo

Assistant Professor,

Department of Plant Pathology
201F Plant Science Building
1405 Veterans Drive
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40546, USA

Phone : 859-257-7445 x 81292 (office)


Email : apkach2@uky.edu

 

http://www.ca.uky.edu/agcollege/plantpathology/people/index.html

 

Ph.D in 2000

 Dr. Aardra Kachroo's Present work :   PLANT MICROBE INTERACTION

The current research in my lab is focused on deciphering defense-signaling pathways in Arabidopsis and soybean plants using mutant analysis and virus-induced gene silencing to examine gene functions. We are interested in dissecting resistance signaling to viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens, and are particularly interested in examining the interconnection between normal metabolic pathways and host defense. Our previous work has implicated fatty acid and glycerol metabolism in the Arabidopsis resistance response. Current research is focused on deciphering the various regulatory roles of fatty acids and glycerol in plants, and will potentially identify downstream defense-related protein/gene targets, that also participate in the plantís metabolic pathways.

 

Dr. Gopal Iyer

Ph.D in 2003

 
 

Dr. Malali Gowda

 

Director, The Genomics Facility

Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platforms

The National Centre for Biological Sciences

Bangalore 580 065, India.

 

Mob : 09620836478

http://www.ncbs.res.in

 

Ph.D in 2004

 
Dr. Sanjay Bhave

Ph.D in 2004

 
Dr. Sachin Tendulkar

Ph.D in 2004

 
 

Dr. R.C. Venu

 

Postdoctoral Associate

University of Arkansas

USDA - ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Centre

2890 HWY 130 East, Stuttgart, AR 72160


Phone : 870 672 9300 ext. 235
 

http://ars.usda.gov/spa/dbnrrc/mpp

Ph.D in 2006

 

 

Dr. Subhankar Roy-Barman

 

Assistant Professor

Dept. of Biotechnology

National Institute of Technology, Durgapur

Mahatma Gandhi Avenue

Durgapur - 713 209

West Bengal, India

 

Phone : +91 343 22755209; Fax : +91 343 2547375

Mob : +91 9433269277

 

Email : sroybarman@gmail.com

 

http://www.nitdgp.ac.in/bt/index.html

Ph.D in 2006

 Dr. Roy-Barman's present work : Molecular Plant Microbe interaction

Molecular plant pathology with special interest in understanding of molecular plant-microbe interaction, using rice-blast fungus model patho-system and functional genomics approaches. Specifically the goals include understanding mechanisms defense response in the monocot host and uncovering the mechanisms of fungal pathogenesis.

     

Dr. Vaishali J Patel

Ph.D in 2007

 
Dr. Rajesh N Patkar

 

Post Doc Fellow

Temasek Life Sciences Lab

1 Research Link,

Temasek Life Sciences Lab,

Singapore 117604

 

Phone : +65 68727491; Mob : +65 92260733

 

Email : rajanna.7@gmail.com, rajesh@tll.org.sg

 

http://www.tll.org.sg

Ph.D in 2007

Dr. Patkar's Present work : Fungal Patho-Biology

We are exploring the basic molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying fungal pathogenesis. The long-term goal is to elucidate specific developmental and physiological programs evolved by fungal pathogens to infect and colonize host tissues. Presently, we are working on the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and its host Rice, as a model pathosystem for understanding fungal virulence and host specificity. We rely on molecular genetics, cell biology, biochemistry and functional genomics as tools to understand the molecular and regulatory basis of the infection-related development in fungal pathogens and to elucidate the underlying basis of the fungus-host interactions. The research is currently focused on functional characterization of some of the interesting knock out strains.

 

Dr. Tulika Munshi

Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
& The Institute of Structural Molecular Biology,
Birkbeck College, University of London,
Malet Street,
London WC1E 7HX,
United Kingdom

Phone: 0044 (0)20 7079 0799 (lab)
tulika_munshi@yahoo.com

Ph.D in 2007

Dr. Munshi's Present work :

Currently working on structural and functional characterisation of some Mycobacterial enzymes which are potential targets for drug development.

 

Dr. Sanjay Jha

 

Assistant Professor

Navsari Agricultural University

Navsari

Ph.D in 2008

 
Dr. Devesh Suthar

 

Lecturer

Dept of Biochemistry

M.S. University of Baroda

Baroda - 390 002

India

 

Mobile: +91-98245 83574

 

Email : dev_su@yahoo.com

Ph.D in 2008

Dr. Suthar's present work :

Bioprospecting of microbial endophytes: This work involves isolation and characterization of endophytes from selected medicinal plants. Currently, we are screening the endophyte isolates for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The long term aim of this work is to explore and evaluate the potential of bioactive compounds produced by these endophytes for use in medical, agricultural, and industrial arenas.

Metabolic engineering to improve productivity in industrial microorganisms: Here we make use of an metabolic engineering approach that is based on the observation that the heterologous expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) enhances growth and productivity in various prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts under oxygen-limiting conditions.

 

Dr.. Archana Patkar (Gupta)

Research Associate
Dr. Zbynek Bozdech's lab
School of Biological Sciences
Nanyang Technological University
60 Nanyang Drive
Singapore 637551

Tel: +65 6316 2927
Fax: +65 6791 3856
Mob: +65 93291760

Email: archna.16g@gmail.com

Ph.D in 2008

Dr. Patkar's Present work :

Epigenetics in Malarial parasite Plasmodium Falciparum. The aim of the project is to characterize global effects of antimalarial drugs on P. falciparum using ChIP on Chip technology.

Dr. Bishun Deo Prasad

Post Doc Fellow
Dept. of Biology
The University of Western Ontario
1151 Richmond St. N.
London, ON, CANADA N6A 5B7

Phone: 519-661-2111 Ext- 80262

Email: dev.bishnu@gmail.com, bprasad2@uwo.ca

Ph.D in 2008

Dr. Prasad's Present work :

Exploring the basic molecular mechanism by which brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of naturally occurring plant steroidal compounds, confer tolerance in plants to a range of environmental stresses.

 


Copyright © 2003
Bioinformatics Centre , Dept. of Microbiology and Biotechnology Centre
M.S.University of Baroda,Baroda, India 390002 Phone:91-0265-2794396 , Fax: 91-265-2792508

Last updated: Thursday, 28 October, 2010 01:12 PM